WELCOME TO ~~FOR HEART AND HOME~~

Welcome to my blog ~For Heart and Home~. Thank you to my dear friend Linda from New York who took the pictures I sent her and made this beautiful banner for me. I visualized what I wanted it to look like and she made it happen. That is my sister and I as youngsters and yes, that is the home I grew up in during the 40's and 50's. Right about now, you are all probably saying, my goodness she is old. I am vintage, just like fine old lace. Thank you also to my good friend Debbi, from Oregon who answered questions non stop while I was trying to navigate the workings of the blog world. What is so wonderful is that friendships can reach across the miles and even tho we have never seen each other in person - through the wonders of the computer, we have developed that bond. Also, a big thank you to my good friend Mona also from New York, who often helps me after I have totally screwed something up on the computer. I feel very Blessed to have you all as my friends. Thank you and I hope everyone enjoys my blog. I know I will.

Tuesday, November 11, 2008

REMEMBRANCE DAY - WHY THE POPPY?


Today, November 11th, we give honor to our fallen soldiers by wearing a red poppy. Here is a bit of the history of the poppy.

Why the Poppy?

Today, fields of brilliant poppies still grow in France.
A writer first made the connection between the poppy and battlefield deaths during the Napoleonic wars of the early 19th century, remarking that fields that were barren before battle exploded with the blood-red flowers after the fighting ended.

During the tremendous bombardments of the First World War the chalk soils became rich in lime from rubble, allowing 'popaver rhoeas' to thrive. When the war ended the lime was quickly absorbed, and the poppy began to disappear again.

After John McCrae's poem In Flanders Fields was published in 1915 the poppy became a popular symbol for soldiers who died in battle.

Three years later an American, Moina Michael, was working in a New York City YMCA canteen when she started wearing a poppy in memory of the millions who died on the battlefield.

During a 1920 visit to the United States a French woman, Madame Guerin, learned of the custom. On her return to France she decided to use handmade poppies to raise money for the destitute children in war-torn areas of the country. In November, 1921, the first poppies were distributed in Canada.

Thanks to the millions of Canadians who wear flowers each November, the little red plant has never died. And neither have Canadian's memories for 116,031 of their countrymen who died in battle.

3 comments:

Sandra Evertson said...

Lovely, and beautiful angel below!
Sandra Evertson

Bevie said...

I had heard this history before when I was President of the women of the our local VFW. I think that was a wonderful thing for you to add to your blog for many haven't heard it!!! ((hugs))

Debbi said...

Hi Sandi--love your music!
hey pop over to my blog--I have an award for you!!